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Posts from Ann about issues of note regarding her areas of practice.

Myth No. 1:
“I’m single and have no children, so I do not need a will.”

Wrong, on many levels.

A: Think about who gets your stuff.

If you have a bank account, own a home, a car, or have any significant assets of any kind, the first reason you want a will is to be sure that whatever assets you own go to the person or persons you want to get them, with the least amount of hassle.

With no will, the State of Georgia decides who gets any property, even if it’s just a small amount of savings or a car that’s paid for.  

If you are single with no children at your death, under Georgia law (O.C.G.A. § 53-2-1) the following people will be your legal heirs and thus entitled to your entire probate estate if you die without a valid will ("intestate"):

“Picture yourself in a boat on a river, with tangerine trees and marmalade skies…”

So, what does the famous first line from a famous Beatles’ song have to do with estate planning?

Actually, imagining a disembodied state is a good way to start planning what happens to your “estate,” a fancy word for your “stuff.” Picture yourself sort of floating above the craziness of life, as it slowly dawns on you that you’re not actually alive and taking part in all the chaos. You’re looking at all your loved ones, who are trying to carry on without you, doing their best to figure out what you wanted to do with all your stuff, not to mention who’s supposed to care for those who depend on you, like your kids or pets.

Before signing and being bound by a contract, it is always a good idea to get input from legal counsel to ensure full comprehension of all the repercussions of the agreement. The sense of comfort gained from a complete understanding is invaluable, and the relatively small investment can pay dividends many times over in dispute avoidance and resolution.

Over many years, Ann Grier has represented individuals and small and mid-size companies in a wide variety of contract matters and litigation, including negotiation of contractual terms in the areas of employment, real estate, business deals, professional contracts, and service agreements.

It is crucial to know how the law can affect your personal rights and your property rights. Every matter is different with its own unique factors and considerations. Experienced counsel is essential to guide you in matters of contracts, estate planning, elder care, probate, and wills.

Wills are not just for the wealthy. Regardless of your age or marital status, and whether you are childless or the head of a large household, preparing a will is an essential, responsible step for every adult to take. In addition to giving you great peace of mind, you are providing a roadmap for your loved ones, who won't have to make important decisions about your assets or personal responsibilities on their own.

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